Tell Your Friends and Family, Don’t Pink For Me

By Lopa Pal, Development Manager

The floodgates are already opening for a month of slick corporate profiteering, meaningless pink ribbon products, and “awareness.”

If you want to push back on Pinktober and make sure money raised for breast cancer goes to meaningful change, ask your friends and family to donate to your Don’t Pink For Me fundraising page.

Breast Cancer Action never takes corporate funding from any company that profits from or contributes to breast cancer. That’s why we count on you, our community, to help fund our work. Don’t Pink For Me is an online fundraising platform designed for you. Use it to spread the word about what Breast Cancer Action is doing to address and end the breast cancer epidemic, and help fund our important work. With Pinktober looming, now is a great time to start your own campaign.

You can personalize your fundraiser to tell your story, ask for pledges for a community bike ride or “Turkey Trot,” or commemorate a special date and ask for a donation in your honor. Get creative and do what feels meaningful to you. We are here to support you. If you have questions or want to discuss an idea, please don’t hesitate to contact me at lpal@bcaction.org.

Plus, anyone who signs up to start a Don’t Pink For Me page over the next month will get their own “Don’t Pink For Me” kit, which includes 25 each of Cancer Sucks buttons, stickers, and our Critical Questions for Conscious Consumers cards. And, the first 5 people who raise $500, will get their very own copy of the thought-provoking book, Pink Ribbons, Inc. by Samantha King

Give us a jump start on our 2017 Think Before You Pink® campaign by fundraising to support our work with your Don’t Pink For Me page today!

Thanks for all you do to support Breast Cancer Action and for asking your friends Don’t Pink For Me!

This entry was posted in BCA Action Alerts.

One Response to Tell Your Friends and Family, Don’t Pink For Me

  1. Rod Ritchie says:

    At PinktoberSucks.com we wish to bring a full awareness of the reality of the disease to the general public, and ensure that there is transparency in where the proceeds donated end up, the percentage going to reputable medical institutions looking for cures, and the funds publicly accounted for.

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